Christian Coalition, religious right

TopicBill numbersort iconAuthorInterest positionBecame law
An Act to Add Chapter 5.2 (Commencing with Section 19990.101) to Division 8 of the Business and Professions Code, Relating to Gambling. AB 431 (2015-2016) GrayOpposeNo
Existing law, the Gambling Control Act, provides for the licensure and regulation of various legalized gambling activities and establishments by the California Gambling Control Commission and the… More
Existing law, the Gambling Control Act, provides for the licensure and regulation of various legalized gambling activities and establishments by the California Gambling Control Commission and the investigation and enforcement of those activities and establishments by the Department of Justice. This bill would declare the Legislature’s intent regarding the authorization of Internet poker within the borders of the state. The bill would require the Legislature, among other things, to include consumer protections for Californians in any Internet poker framework that may be adopted by the Legislature to authorize Internet poker in the state, to ensure that framework provides a fair share of revenue for the state, and to include strict standards in that framework to ensure that the Internet poker games are fair. The bill would also make related legislative findings and declarations. Hide
An Act to Add Sections 66290.1 and 66290.2 to the Education Code, Relating to Discrimination. SB 1146 (2015-2016) LaraOpposeYes
The Equity in Higher Education Act, among other things, prohibits a person from being subjected to discrimination on the basis of specified attributes, including sex, in any program or activity… More
The Equity in Higher Education Act, among other things, prohibits a person from being subjected to discrimination on the basis of specified attributes, including sex, in any program or activity conducted by a postsecondary educational institution that receives, or benefits from, state financial assistance or enrolls students who receive state student financial aid. Existing federal law, known as Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, prohibits a person, on the basis of sex, from being excluded from participation in, being denied the benefits of, or being subject to discrimination under, any education program or activity receiving federal financial assistance. Both the federal and state laws do not apply to an educational institution that is controlled by a religious organization if the application would not be consistent with the religious tenets of that organization. Title IX provides a private right of action for violation of its provisions by a public postsecondary educational institution. This bill would require an institution that has an exemption from either the Equity in Higher Education Act or Title IX to make specified disclosures to the institution’s current and prospective students, faculty members, and employees, and to the Student Aid Commission, concerning the institution’s basis for having the exemption. The bill would require the commission to collect the information it receives and post and maintain a list on the commission’s Internet Web site of all institutions with the exemption and their respective bases for having the exemption. This bill would make its provisions severable. Hide
An Act to Add Part 1.85 (Commencing with Section 443) to Division 1 of the Health and Safety Code, Relating to End of Life. SB 128 (2015-2016) WolkOpposeNo
Existing law authorizes an adult to give an individual health care instruction and to appoint an attorney to make health care decisions for that individual in the event of his or her incapacity… More
Existing law authorizes an adult to give an individual health care instruction and to appoint an attorney to make health care decisions for that individual in the event of his or her incapacity pursuant to a power of attorney for health care. This bill would enact the End of Life Option Act authorizing an adult who meets certain qualifications, and who has been determined by his or her attending physician to be suffering from a terminal disease, as defined, to make a request for a drug prescribed pursuant to these provisions for the purpose of ending his or her life. The bill would establish the procedures for making these requests. The bill would also establish the forms to request an aid-in-dying drug and, under specified circumstances, an interpreter declaration to be signed subject to penalty of perjury, thereby creating a crime and imposing state-mandated local program. This bill would require specified information to be documented in the individual’s medical record, including, among other things, all oral and written requests for an aid-in-dying drug. This bill would prohibit a provision in a contract, will, or other agreement from being conditioned upon or affected by a person making or rescinding a request for the above-described drug. The bill would prohibit the sale, procurement, or issuance of any life, health, or annuity policy, health care service plan, contract, or health benefit plan, or the rate charged for any policy or plan contract, from being conditioned upon or affected by the request. The bill would prohibit an insurance carrier from providing any information in communications made to an individual about the availability of an aid-in-dying drug absent a request by the individual or his or her attending physician at the behest of the individual. The bill would also prohibit any communication from containing both the denial of treatment and information as to the availability of aid-in-dying drug coverage. This bill would provide immunity from civil, criminal, administrative, employment, or contractual liability or professional disciplinary action for participating in good faith compliance with the act, and would specify that the immunities and prohibitions on sanctions of a health care provider are solely reserved for conduct provided for by the bill. The bill would make participation in activities authorized pursuant to its provisions voluntary, and would make health care providers immune from liability for refusing to engage in activities authorized pursuant to its provisions. The bill would authorize a health care provider to prohibit its employees, independent contractors, or other persons or entities, including other health care providers, from participating in activities under the act while on the premises owned or under the management or direct control of that prohibiting health care provider, or while acting within the course and scope of any employment by, or contract with, the prohibiting health care provider. This bill would make it a felony to knowingly alter or forge a request for drugs to end an individual’s life without his or her authorization or to conceal or destroy a withdrawal or rescission of a request for a drug, if it is done with the intent or effect of causing the individual’s death. The bill would make it a felony to knowingly coerce or exert undue influence on an individual to request a drug for the purpose of ending his or her life or to destroy a withdrawal or rescission of a request. By creating a new crime, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The bill would provide that nothing in its provisions is to be construed to authorize ending a patient’s life by lethal injection, mercy killing, or active euthanasia, and would provide that action taken in accordance with the act shall not constitute, among other things, suicide or homicide. This bill would require the State Public Health Officer to adopt regulations establishing additional reporting requirements for physicians and pharmacists to determine the use of, and compliance with, the act, and would require the State Public Health Officer to annually review a sample of certain records and the State Department of Public Health to make a statistical report of the information collected. Existing constitutional provisions require that a statute that limits the right of access to the meetings of public bodies or the writings of public officials and agencies be adopted with findings demonstrating the interest protected by the limitation and the need for protecting that interest. This bill would make legislative findings to that effect. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
An Act to Amend Section 460 Of, and to Add and Repeal Chapter 10.5 (Commencing with Section 4600) of Division 2 Of, the Business and Professions Code, and to Amend Section 51034 of the Government Code, Relating to Healing Arts. AB 1147 (2013-2014) BonillaSupportYes
Existing law, until January 1, 2015, provides for the voluntary certification of massage practitioners and massage therapists by the California Massage Therapy Council. Existing law specifies the… More
Existing law, until January 1, 2015, provides for the voluntary certification of massage practitioners and massage therapists by the California Massage Therapy Council. Existing law specifies the requirements for the council to issue to an applicant a certificate as a massage practitioner or massage therapist. Existing law authorizes a city, county, or city and county to impose certain requirements on massage establishments or businesses that are the sole proprietorship of an individual certified pursuant to existing state law or that employ or use only persons who are so certified. Existing law authorizes a city, county, or city and county to, among other things, adopt reasonable health and safety requirements, as specified, pertaining to those massage establishments or businesses, and to require an applicant for a business license to operate a massage business or establishment to fill out an application that requests relevant information, as specified. This bill would reenact, revise, and recast these provisions to, among other things, establish an interim board of directors to govern the council until September 15, 2015, and provide for the appointment of a new board of directors consisting of 13 members, as specified, whose 4-year terms would begin on that date. The bill would authorize the board to establish fees reasonably related to the costs of providing services and performing its duties, not to exceed $300. The bill would require the board to provide at least 90 days’ advance notice prior to holding a meeting to vote upon a proposal to increase the certification fees, as specified, except as provided. The bill would also require the board to notify certificate holders of a board action that increases those fees. The bill would discontinue the issuance of new massage practitioner certificates after January 1, 2015, except as provided, but would authorize the renewal of massage practitioner certificates issued prior to January 1, 2015. The bill would require that all certificates issued pursuant to these provisions be subject to renewal every 2 years, except as provided. The bill would require the council to develop policies, procedures, rules, or bylaws governing the approval and unapproval of schools that provide education required for certification, as specified. The bill would authorize the council to deny an application for a certificate, or to discipline a certificate holder for a violation of these provisions, as specified. The bill would require the board to exercise its denial or discipline authority by means of fair and reasonable procedures that, among other things, provide the applicant or certificate holder with notice and an opportunity to be heard, as specified. The bill would provide that unprofessional conduct in violation of these provisions includes, among other things, engaging in sexually suggestive advertising related to massage services and engaging in sexual activity while providing massage services for compensation. The bill would, notwithstanding any other law, prohibit a city, county, or city and county from enacting or enforcing an ordinance that conflicts with these provisions or other corresponding specified provisions. However, the bill would authorize a city, county, or city and county to adopt or enforce local ordinances that govern zoning, business licensing, or reasonable health and safety requirements for establishments or businesses of a licensed or certified healing arts professional, including a certified massage therapist. The bill would also make clarifying and conforming changes regarding local regulation of massage establishments or businesses. The bill would authorize a court to issue an injunction or to provide any other relief it deems appropriate for violations of these provisions, as specified. The bill would provide that the powers and duties of the council are subject to review by the appropriate committees of the Legislature and would require the council to provide a specified report to these committees on or before June 1, 2016. The bill would provide that these provisions are issues of statewide concern, and therefore applicable statewide. The bill would also provide that its provisions are severable. The bill would repeal these provisions on January 1, 2017. Hide
An Act to Amend Section 221.5 of the Education Code, Relating to Pupil Rights. AB 1266 (2013-2014) AmmianoOpposeYes
Existing law prohibits public schools from discriminating on the basis of specified characteristics, including gender, gender identity, and gender expression, and specifies various statements of… More
Existing law prohibits public schools from discriminating on the basis of specified characteristics, including gender, gender identity, and gender expression, and specifies various statements of legislative intent and the policies of the state in that regard. Existing law requires that participation in a particular physical education activity or sport, if required of pupils of one sex, be available to pupils of each sex. This bill would require that a pupil be permitted to participate in sex-segregated school programs and activities, including athletic teams and competitions, and use facilities consistent with his or her gender identity, irrespective of the gender listed on the pupil’s records. Hide
An Act to Amend Section 2253 Of, and to Add Sections 2725.4 and 3502.4 To, the Business and Professions Code, and to Amend Section 123468 of the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Healing Arts. AB 154 (2013-2014) AtkinsOpposeYes
Existing law makes it a public offense, punishable by a fine not exceeding $10,000 or imprisonment, or both, for a person to perform or assist in performing a surgical abortion if the person does not… More
Existing law makes it a public offense, punishable by a fine not exceeding $10,000 or imprisonment, or both, for a person to perform or assist in performing a surgical abortion if the person does not have a valid license to practice as a physician and surgeon, or to assist in performing a surgical abortion without a valid license or certificate obtained in accordance with some other law that authorizes him or her to perform the functions necessary to assist in performing a surgical abortion. Existing law also makes it a public offense, punishable by a fine not exceeding $10,000 or imprisonment, or both, for a person to perform or assist in performing a nonsurgical abortion if the person does not have a valid license to practice as a physician and surgeon or does not have a valid license or certificate obtained in accordance with some other law authorizing him or her to perform or assist in performing the functions necessary for a nonsurgical abortion. Under existing law, nonsurgical abortion includes termination of pregnancy through the use of pharmacological agents. Existing law, the Nursing Practice Act, provides for the licensure and regulation of registered nurses, including nurse practitioners and certified nurse-midwives, by the Board of Registered Nursing. Existing law, the Physician Assistant Practice Act, provides for the licensure and regulation of physician assistants by the Physician Assistant Board within the jurisdiction of the Medical Board of California. This bill would instead make it a public offense, punishable by a fine not exceeding $10,000 or imprisonment, or both, for a person to perform an abortion if the person does not have a valid license to practice as a physician and surgeon, except that it would not be a public offense for a person to perform an abortion by medication or aspiration techniques in the first trimester of pregnancy if he or she holds a license or certificate authorizing him or her to perform the functions necessary for an abortion by medication or aspiration techniques. The bill would also require a nurse practitioner, certified nurse-midwife, or physician assistant to complete training, as specified, and to comply with standardized procedures or protocols, as specified, in order to perform an abortion by aspiration techniques, and would indefinitely authorize a nurse practitioner, certified nurse-midwife, or physician assistant who completed a specified training program and achieved clinical competency to continue to perform abortions by aspiration techniques. The bill would delete the references to a nonsurgical abortion and would delete the restrictions on assisting with abortion procedures. The bill would also make technical, nonsubstantive changes. Because the bill would change the definition of crimes, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
An Act to Amend, Repeal, and Add Sections 102425 and 102430 Of, to Add Sections 102425.1 and 102425.2 To, and to Repeal Section 102150 Of, the Health and Safety Code, Relating to Vital Records. AB 1951 (2013-2014) GomezOpposeYes
Existing law prescribes the duties of the State Registrar of Vital Statistics and local registrars of births and deaths with respect to the registration of a live birth. Under existing law, a… More
Existing law prescribes the duties of the State Registrar of Vital Statistics and local registrars of births and deaths with respect to the registration of a live birth. Under existing law, a certificate of live birth is required to contain, among other things, the full name, birthplace, and date of birth of both the father and mother of a child, except as provided. Existing law provides for the Vital Statistics Advisory Committee, which, among other things, is required to review and make recommendations to the State Registrar as to proposals for addition or deletion of items on the certificate of live birth and advise the State Registrar on the content and format of the certificate. Existing law requires the State Registrar to publish within 30 days of receipt of recommendations by the committee, both a list of the recommendations adopted and a list of the recommendations not adopted, with reasons for the action. This bill would, commencing January 1, 2016, instead require the State Registrar, with regard to identification of the parents, to modify the certificate of live birth to contain 2 lines that both read “Name of Parent” and contain, next to each parent’s name, 3 checkboxes with the options of mother, father, and parent to describe the parent’s relationship to the child. The bill would also require that all local registrars, deputy registrars, and subregistrars use the modified certificate of live birth, update all forms to incorporate the modification, and discard all forms in use before the modification. The bill would, for a birth occurring prior to January 1, 2016, authorize a parent to amend specified parental titles on the certificate of live birth to the parent relationship designation described above. The bill would require, if the birth mother is listed on the certificate of live birth, the birth mother’s name, date of birth, and place of birth to be linked to her medical and social information, and would require that the linkage be confidential, as specified. The bill would make technical and conforming changes. Hide
An Act to Amend Section 1203.4 Of, and to Add Section 311.12 To, the Penal Code, Relating to Obscene Matter. AB 20 (2013-2014) WaldronSupportYes
Existing law generally prohibits the production, distribution, and production of any representation of information, data, or image, as specified, of any obscene matter that depicts a person under 18… More
Existing law generally prohibits the production, distribution, and production of any representation of information, data, or image, as specified, of any obscene matter that depicts a person under 18 years of age personally engaging in or personally simulating sexual conduct, as defined. Violations of these provisions are crimes. This bill would provide that every person who is convicted of a violation of specified offenses relating to obscene matter involving minors, as specified, in which the violation is committed on, or via, a government-owned computer or via a government-owned computer network, or in which the production, transportation, or distribution of which involves the use, possession, or control of government-owned property shall, in addition to any imprisonment of fine imposed for the commission of the underlying offense, be punished by a fine not exceeding $2,000, unless the court determines that the defendant does not have the ability to pay. The bill would provide that revenue from any fines collected would be transferred for deposit into a county fund established for that purpose and allocated for sexual assault investigator training, public agencies and nonprofit corporations that provide shelter, counseling, or other direct services for victims of human trafficking, and multidisciplinary teams involved in the prosecution of child abuse cases, as specified. Existing law allows for the release from all penalties and disabilities resulting from an offense for which the person was convicted if specified criteria are met. Existing law excludes certain sex offenses from these provisions. This bill would additionally exclude specified offenses relating to obscene matter involving minors from these provisions. Hide
An Act to Amend Sections 300, 301, 302, 420, 500, 720, 721, 750, 751, 752, 754, 761, 1102, 1500, 1620, 1839, 2200, 2201, 2210, 2211, 2322, 2400, 2401, 3120, 3450, 3551, 3580, 3585, 3600, 4323, and 4930 Of, to Amend the Heading of Chapter 2 (Commencing with Section 720) of Part 1 of Division 4 Of, to Amend the Heading of Chapter 3 (Commencing with Section 1620) of Part 5 of Division 4 Of, to Repeal Section 308.5 Of, and to Repeal and Add Section 308 Of, the Family Code, Relating to Marriage. SB 1306 (2013-2014) LenoOpposeYes
An existing provision of the California Constitution, which has been held unenforceable, states that only marriage between a man and a woman is valid or recognized in this state. An existing… More
An existing provision of the California Constitution, which has been held unenforceable, states that only marriage between a man and a woman is valid or recognized in this state. An existing statutory provision likewise provides that only marriage between a man and a woman is valid or recognized in this state. This bill would repeal that statutory provision. Existing statutory law provides that marriage is a personal relationship arising out of a civil contract between a man and a woman. Under existing law, a marriage contracted outside this state that would be valid by the laws of the jurisdiction in which the marriage was contracted is valid in this state, except that a marriage between 2 persons of the same sex contracted outside this state is valid in this state only if the marriage was contracted prior to November 5, 2008. This bill would instead provide that marriage is a personal relation arising out of a civil contract between 2 persons, and would make conforming changes with regard to the consent to, and solemnization of, marriage. The bill would also delete the limitation on the validity of marriages contracted outside this state between 2 persons of the same sex. Under existing law, a reference to “husband” and “wife,” “spouses,” or “married persons,” or a comparable term, includes persons who are lawfully married to each other and persons who were previously lawfully married to each other, as is appropriate under the circumstances of the particular case. The bill would delete references to “husband” or “wife” in the Family Code and would instead refer to a “spouse,” and would make other related changes. Existing law establishes, except as specified, a rebuttable presumption of decreased need for spousal support if the supported party is cohabiting with a person of the opposite sex. This bill would make that rebuttable presumption of decreased need for spousal support applicable if the supported party is cohabitating with a “nonmarital partner.” This bill would declare that the purpose of the act is to clarify that laws relating to marriage and the rights and responsibilities of spouses apply equally to opposite-sex and same-sex spouses and that the changes are not intended to affect existing decisional law otherwise interpreting the laws amended in the act. Hide
An Act to Add Chapter 4.7 (Commencing with Section 19750) to Division 8 of the Business and Professions Code, to Add Section 12012.6 to the Government Code, and to Amend Sections 336.9 and 337a of the Penal Code, Relating to Gambling, and Declaring the Urgency Thereof, to Take Effect Immediately. SB 190 (2013-2014) WrightOpposeNo
(1)The California Constitution prohibits various gaming activities within the state, including casino-style gaming, but authorizes the Governor, subject to ratification by the Legislature, to… More
(1)The California Constitution prohibits various gaming activities within the state, including casino-style gaming, but authorizes the Governor, subject to ratification by the Legislature, to negotiate and conclude compacts for the operation of slot machines and the conduct of lottery games and banking and percentage card games by federally recognized Indian tribes on Indian lands in California in accordance with federal law. The California Constitution also authorizes the Legislature to provide for the regulation of horse racing, charitable bingo games, the California State Lottery, and charitable raffles. Existing law prohibits a person, whether or not for gain, hire, or reward, from making a betting pool or placing a bet or wager on the result of any contest or event, including a sporting event, as specified. The Gambling Control Act provides for the licensure of certain individuals and establishments that conduct controlled games, as defined, and for the regulation of these gambling activities by the California Gambling Control Commission. Existing law provides for the enforcement of those regulations by the Department of Justice. Any violation of these provisions is punishable as a misdemeanor, as specified. The Horse Racing Law provides for the licensure of every person who participates in, or has anything to do with, the racing of horses, and every employee of a parimutuel department by the California Horse Racing Board. The board is responsible for adopting rules and regulations for the protection of the public, the control of horse racing, and parimutuel wagering, as well as enforcing all laws, rules, and regulations dealing with horse racing and parimutuel wagering. The law permits the board to authorize an association licensed to conduct a racing meeting to also operate a satellite wagering facility at its racetrack inclosure, and for fairs to locate a satellite wagering facility at their fairgrounds, under specified conditions. Any violation of these provisions is punishable as a misdemeanor. This bill would authorize the owner or operator of a gambling establishment, or the owner or operator of a horse racing track, including a horse racing association, or of a satellite wagering facility, with a current license, to conduct wagering on professional and collegiate sports or athletic events, other than on collegiate sports or athletic events that take place in California or in which any California college team participates, by applying to the California Gambling Control Commission or the California Horse Racing Board, as specified, for authorization to conduct sports wagering, and by paying an annual fee for deposit in the Gambling Addiction Program Fund. The bill would require each licensed entity to remit to the Treasurer on a monthly basis for deposit in the General Fund, an amount equal to 7.5% of its gross revenues generated by sports wagering activities. The bill would require the commission, the board, and the department to adopt regulations to implement these provisions, including authority to adopt regulations establishing fees in a reasonable amount to recover costs incurred performing their duties pursuant to these provisions. The bill would require the department, among other things, to investigate any request made by the board or the commission in connection with an application for authorization, and to investigate suspected violations of the above provisions. The bill would authorize the board, commission, and department to regulate sports wagering to the same extent these entities currently regulate other legal gambling in this state, including the ability to audit the books and records of a licensed entity related to the sports wagering activity. The bill would also prohibit a licensed entity from, among other things, accepting a wager from any person who is under 21 years of age or whose name appears on a self-exclusion list. Any violation of these provisions would be punishable as a crime. By creating a new crime, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. (2)Existing federal law, the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988 (IGRA), provides for the negotiation and execution of tribal-state gaming compacts for the purpose of authorizing certain types of gaming on Indian lands within a state. The California Constitution authorizes the Governor to negotiate and conclude compacts, subject to ratification by the Legislature. Existing law expressly ratifies a number of tribal-state gaming compacts, and amendments of tribal-state gaming compacts, between the State of California and specified Indian tribes. This bill would authorize a federally recognized Indian tribe that is not a gambling establishment or a horse racing track, or that has entered into a compact agreement with the state authorizing the operation of a satellite wagering facility, to conduct sports wagering as authorized by IGRA, pursuant to the model tribal-state sports wagering compact described below.This bill would create a model tribal-state sports wagering compact and would provide that, by the enactment of this measure, the state grants a model tribal-state sports wagering compact for the conduct of sports wagering on Indian lands to a federally recognized California Indian tribe that exercises jurisdiction over those Indian lands. The bill would provide for the tribe to adopt the authority through the signature of the tribal chief executive officer, as specified. No further action by the Governor or the state would be required in order to conduct sports wagering, but the tribe would be responsible for submitting a copy of the compact executed by the tribe to the United States Secretary of the Interior for publication of the notice of approval in the Federal Register, pursuant to IGRA.(3)The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. (4)This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as an urgency statute. Hide
An Act to Amend Section 6361 Of, and to Add Section 23701.3 To, the Revenue and Taxation Code, Relating to Taxation, to Take Effect Immediately, Tax Levy. SB 323 (2013-2014) LaraOpposeNo
The Sales and Use Tax Law exempts from the taxes imposed by that law the sales of food products, nonalcoholic beverages, and other tangible personal property made or produced by an organization, as… More
The Sales and Use Tax Law exempts from the taxes imposed by that law the sales of food products, nonalcoholic beverages, and other tangible personal property made or produced by an organization, as defined, but only if sold on an irregular or intermittent basis and the organization’s profits from the sales are used exclusively in furtherance of the purposes of the organization. The Corporation Tax Law, in modified conformity with federal income tax laws, exempts the income of various types of organizations from taxes imposed by that law. This bill would revise the Sales and Use Tax Law exemption for those organizations, as provided. This bill would also provide, for taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 2014, that an organization that is a public charity youth organization that discriminates on the basis of gender identity, race, sexual orientation, nationality, religion, or religious affiliation is not exempt from the taxes imposed by that law. This bill would include a change in state statute that would result in a taxpayer paying a higher tax within the meaning of Section 3 of Article XIIIA of the California Constitution, and thus would require for passage the approval of 23 of the membership of each house of the Legislature. This bill would take effect immediately as a tax levy. Hide
An Act to Amend Sections 19817 and 19840 Of, and to Repeal Section 19818 Of, the Business and Professions Code, Relating to Gaming. SB 601 (2013-2014) YeeOpposeNo
The Gambling Control Act provides for the licensure and regulation of various legalized gambling activities and establishments by the California Gambling Control Commission and the investigation and… More
The Gambling Control Act provides for the licensure and regulation of various legalized gambling activities and establishments by the California Gambling Control Commission and the investigation and enforcement of those activities and establishments by the Department of Justice.Existing law requires the commission to establish and appoint a Gaming Policy Advisory Committee of 10 members. Existing law requires the committee to be composed of representatives of controlled gambling licensees and members of the general public in equal numbers. Existing law requires the committee to be convened to discuss matters of controlled gambling regulatory policy and any other relevant gambling-related issue.This bill would instead provide that the commission shall appoint 5 representatives of controlled gambling licensees and 5 members of the general public to the committee. The bill would also provide that the Senate Committee on Rules and the Speaker of the Assembly shall each appoint one additional person employed by the Legislature to serve as ex officio members of the committee. The bill would include, among the issues that may be discussed by the committee, the extent to which the regulation of permitted games, game procedures, and gambling expansion impedes the economic growth of the gambling sector in California, the impact of those regulations on state and local tax and fee proceeds, and the impact of new technologies on gambling. Existing law requires the commission to investigate the consequences, benefits, and disadvantages of imposing a state tax on revenue generated by gambling establishments and the regulation of advertising for the purpose of limiting exposure of children to materials promoting gambling. Existing law requires the commission to report its findings on these matters to the Legislature and the Governor, as specified. This bill would repeal these provisions. Existing law authorizes the commission to adopt regulations for the administration and enforcement of the act. Existing law requires that, to the extent appropriate, regulations of the commission and the department take into consideration the operational differences of large and small establishments. This bill would additionally require the consideration of any fiscal and economic impact that may result from these provisions. Hide
An Act to Add and Repeal Section 17052.7 of the Revenue and Taxation Code, Relating to Taxation, to Take Effect Immediately, Tax Levy. SB 693 (2013-2014) CorreaSupportNo
The Personal Income Tax Law allows various credits against the tax imposed by that law. This bill would, for taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 2014, and before January 1, 2019, allow a… More
The Personal Income Tax Law allows various credits against the tax imposed by that law. This bill would, for taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 2014, and before January 1, 2019, allow a credit against that tax for amounts paid or incurred by a qualified teacher, as defined, for instructional materials and classroom supplies, as defined, not to exceed $250. This bill would take effect immediately as a tax levy. Hide
An Act to Amend Section 784.7 Of, and to Repeal Section 784.8 Of, the Penal Code, Relating to Criminal Jurisdiction. SB 939 (2013-2014) BlockSupportYes
Existing law defines human trafficking as the deprivation of the personal liberty of another person with the intent to effect a violation of certain specified sex crimes, to obtain forced labor or… More
Existing law defines human trafficking as the deprivation of the personal liberty of another person with the intent to effect a violation of certain specified sex crimes, to obtain forced labor or services, or to cause a minor to engage in a commercial sex act with the intent to effect a violation of certain specified sex crimes. Existing law requires, when more than one violation of certain specified provisions of law occurs in more than one jurisdictional territory, that jurisdiction for any of those offenses is in any jurisdiction where at least one of the offenses occurred if all district attorneys in counties with jurisdiction of the offenses agree to the venue. This bill would add human trafficking, pimping, and pandering to the specified offenses to which the above jurisdictional requirements apply. Existing law, when charges alleging multiple incidences of human trafficking that involve the same victim or victims in multiple territorial jurisdictions are filed in one county, requires the court to hold a hearing to consider whether the matter should proceed in the county of filing or whether one or more counts should be severed and to consider specified factors in making this decision, including the location and complexity of the likely evidence and where the majority of the offenses occurred. Existing law requires the district attorney in the filing county to present evidence to the court that the district attorney in each county where any of the charges could have been filed has agreed that the matter should proceed in the county of filing. This bill would reorganize these provisions. Hide
AB 130 (2011-2012) CedilloOpposeYes
AB 131 (2011-2012) CedilloOpposeYes
An Act to Add Section 53069.63 to the Government Code, to Add Part 5.5 (Commencing with Section 1550) to Division 2 of the Labor Code, and to Add Sections 653.65, 653.67, 653.69, 653.71, 653.73, and 653.74 to the Penal Code, Relating to Illegal Immigrants. AB 26 (2011-2012) DonnellySupportNo
Existing law, held unenforceable as preempted by federal law in the case of League of United Latin American Citizens v. Wilson (1997) 997 F.Supp. 1244, prohibits any city, county, or other legally… More
Existing law, held unenforceable as preempted by federal law in the case of League of United Latin American Citizens v. Wilson (1997) 997 F.Supp. 1244, prohibits any city, county, or other legally authorized local governmental entity from preventing or limiting the cooperation of any law enforcement agency with federal authorities regarding persons arrested and suspected of being present in the United States in violation of federal immigration laws, as specified. This bill would prohibit public officials and agencies from adopting a policy that limits or restricts the enforcement of federal immigration laws or that restricts the sharing of a person’s immigration status, as specified. The bill would allow any person to bring an action against an entity to enforce these provisions. Existing law generally regulates employment, including, but not limited to, the wages, hours, and working conditions of employees. This bill would prohibit an employer from knowingly or intentionally employing an unauthorized alien, as specified. The bill would establish a process for persons to file complaints of violations of these provisions with the Attorney General or a district attorney. The bill would make it a misdemeanor to make a false and frivolous complaint alleging a violation of these provisions by an employer. The bill would provide for the investigation of these complaints and specify consequences, including the suspension of certain licenses, for employers that violate these provisions. The bill would require every employer to verify the employment eligibility of employees through the federal E-Verify program and require employers to participate in the federal E-Verify program in order to be eligible for economic development incentives, as specified. Because this bill would impose new duties on local governments and district attorneys, it would impose a state-mandated local program. Existing law, held unenforceable as preempted by federal law in the case of League of United Latin American Citizens v. Wilson (1997) 977 F.Supp. 1244, requires every law enforcement agency, with respect to any person who is arrested and suspected of being present in the United States in violation of federal immigration laws, to, among other things, attempt to verify the legal status of such person and notify the Attorney General and federal authorities of any apparent illegal status. Existing law makes it a felony, punishable in the state prison for 5 years and a fine of $25,000, for any person to use false documents to conceal his or her true citizenship or resident alien status. This bill would make it a misdemeanor for a person to be present on any public or private land while at the same time the person is in violation of specified federal immigration laws. The bill would make it a felony to be in violation of this provision if the person is in possession of specified drugs, weapons, or property, as specified. The bill would make it a felony for a person to intentionally engage in the smuggling of a human being for profit or commercial purposes, as specified, and would provide differing penalties depending on the circumstances of the offense. The bill would make it a misdemeanor for an occupant of a motor vehicle to attempt to hire persons for work if the motor vehicle blocks or impedes the normal movement of traffic. The bill would also make it a misdemeanor to enter a motor vehicle in order to be hired by an occupant if the motor vehicle blocks or impedes the normal movement of traffic. The bill would make it a misdemeanor for a person who is unlawfully present in the United States and who is an unauthorized alien, as defined, to knowingly apply for or solicit work or perform work as an employee or independent contractor. The bill would make it a misdemeanor to transport or move or attempt to transport or move an alien when the person knows, or recklessly disregards the fact, that the alien is in the United States unlawfully, as specified. The bill would make it a misdemeanor to conceal, harbor, or shield or attempt to conceal, harbor, or shield an alien from detection if the person knows, or recklessly disregards the fact, that the alien is in the United States unlawfully, as specified. The bill would make it a misdemeanor to encourage or induce an alien to come to, or reside in, this state if the person knows, or recklessly disregards the fact, that the alien would be entering or residing in this state unlawfully. The bill would make a violation of these provisions a felony if the violation involves 10 or more illegal aliens. Because this bill would create various new crimes, it would impose a state-mandated local program. The bill would require a peace officer to cause the removal and either immobilization or impoundment of a vehicle if the peace officer determines that a person is driving the vehicle while the person is engaged in certain acts involving an alien unlawfully in the United States, as specified. The bill would establish the Gang and Immigration Intelligence Team Enforcement Mission Fund to be funded as specified, and administered by the Department of Justice to be used, upon appropriation, for gang and immigration enforcement and for county jail reimbursements relating to illegal immigration. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that with regard to certain mandates no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. With regard to any other mandates, this bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs so mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above. Hide
An Act to Amend Sections 82036, 82036.5, 84102, 84104,84213, and 84506 Of, and to Amend, Renumber, and Add Section 82047.6 Of, the Government Code, Relating to the Political Reform Act of 1974. AB 481 (2011-2012) GordonOpposeYes
Existing law, the Political Reform Act of 1974, provides for the comprehensive regulation of campaign financing, including requiring the reporting of campaign contributions and expenditures and… More
Existing law, the Political Reform Act of 1974, provides for the comprehensive regulation of campaign financing, including requiring the reporting of campaign contributions and expenditures and imposing other reporting and recordkeeping requirements on campaign committees. This bill would require each campaign committee to identify its principal officer or officers, as defined, and would require each principal officer to maintain the committee’s accounts and records. In addition, the bill would require a committee’s principal officer, in the event the committee files a statement or report disclosing an independent expenditure, to sign a verification verifying that the committee has not received unreported contributions or reimbursements to make the independent expenditure and has not coordinated with the candidate or the opponent of the candidate or the proponent or the opponent of the state measure that is the subject of the expenditure. The Political Reform Act of 1974 defines “late contribution” and “late independent expenditure” as any contribution or independent expenditure totaling in the aggregate $1,000 or more that is made for or against any specific candidate, committee, or measure involved in an election that is made or received before the date of the election but after the closing date of the last campaign statement required to be filed prior to the election. This bill would instead define “late contribution” and “late independent expenditure” to mean a contribution or independent expenditure made within 90 days before the date of the election at which the candidate or measure is to be voted on. The Political Reform Act of 1974 requires that broadcast and mass mailing advertisements supporting or opposing candidates or ballot measures include disclosure statements that reflect specified information. This bill would require any advertisement supporting or opposing candidates or ballot measures to include such disclosure statements. Existing law makes a knowing or willful violation of the Political Reform Act of 1974 a misdemeanor and subjects offenders to criminal penalties. This bill would impose a state-mandated local program by creating additional crimes. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. The Political Reform Act of 1974, an initiative measure, provides that the Legislature may amend the act to further the act’s purposes upon a 23 vote of each house and compliance with specified procedural requirements. This bill would declare that it furthers the purposes of the act. Hide
AB 499 (2011-2012) AtkinsOpposeYes
An Act to Add Article 15 (Commencing with Section 865) to Chapter 1 of Division 2 of the Business and Professions Code, Relating to Healing Arts. SB 1172 (2011-2012) LieuOpposeYes
Existing law provides for licensing and regulation of various professions in the healing arts, including physicians and surgeons, psychologists, marriage and family therapists, educational… More
Existing law provides for licensing and regulation of various professions in the healing arts, including physicians and surgeons, psychologists, marriage and family therapists, educational psychologists, clinical social workers, and licensed professional clinical counselors. This bill would prohibit a mental health provider, as defined, from engaging in sexual orientation change efforts, as defined, with a patient under 18 years of age. The bill would provide that any sexual orientation change efforts attempted on a patient under 18 years of age by a mental health provider shall be considered unprofessional conduct and shall subject the provider to discipline by the provider’s licensing entity. The bill would also declare the intent of the Legislature in this regard. Hide
An Act to Amend Sections 3040, 4057, 7601, and 7612 Of, and to Add Section 4052.5 To, the Family Code, Relating to Parentage. SB 1476 (2011-2012) LenoOpposeNo
(1)Under existing law, a man is conclusively presumed to be the father of a child if he was married to and cohabiting with the child’s mother, except as specified. Existing law also provides that… More
(1)Under existing law, a man is conclusively presumed to be the father of a child if he was married to and cohabiting with the child’s mother, except as specified. Existing law also provides that if a man signs a voluntary declaration of paternity, it has the force and effect of a judgment of paternity, subject to certain exceptions. Existing law further provides that a man is rebuttably presumed to be the father if he was married to, or attempted to marry, the mother before or after the birth of the child, or he receives the child as his own and openly holds the child out as his own. Under existing law, the latter presumptions are rebutted by a judgment establishing paternity by another man. This bill would authorize a court to find that a child has 2 presumed parents notwithstanding the statutory presumption of parentage of the child by another man. The bill would authorize the court to make this finding if doing so would serve the best interest of the child based on the nature, duration, and quality of the presumed or claimed parents’ relationships with the child and the benefit or detriment to the child of continuing those relationships. (2)The Uniform Parentage Act defines the parent and child relationship as the legal relationship existing between a child and the child’s parents, including the mother and child relationship and the father and child relationship, and governs proceedings to establish that relationship. This bill would provide that a child may have a parent and child relationship with more than 2 parents. (3)Existing law requires a family court to determine the best interest of the child for purposes of deciding child custody in proceedings for dissolution of marriage, nullity of marriage, legal separation of the parties, petitions for exclusive custody of a child, and proceedings under the Domestic Violence Prevention Act. In making that determination, the court must consider specified factors, including the health, safety, and welfare of the child. Existing law establishes an order of preference for allocating child custody and directs the court to choose a parenting plan that is in the child’s best interest. This bill would, in the case of a child with more than 2 legal parents, require the court to allocate custody and visitation among the parents based on the best interest of the child, including stability for the child. (4)Under existing law, the parents of a minor child are responsible for supporting the child. Existing law establishes the statewide uniform guideline for calculating court-ordered child support, which is rebuttably presumed to be the correct amount of child support. The guideline directs a court to consider the parents’ incomes, standard of living, and level of responsibility for the child. This bill would direct the court to divide the child support obligations among the parents based on the income of each of the parents and the amount of time spent with the child by each parent, as specified, unless the court finds that applying the statewide uniform guideline to a child with more than 2 legal parents would be unjust and inappropriate. (5)This bill would incorporate additional changes in Section 3040 of the Family Code proposed by SB 1064, that would become operative only if SB 1064 and this bill are both chaptered and become effective on or before January 1, 2013, and this bill is chaptered last. Hide
SB 340 (2011-2012) WolkOpposeNo
SB 40 (2011-2012) CorreaOpposeNo
An Act to Amend Sections 51204.5, 51500, 51501, 60040, and 60044 of the Education Code, Relating to Instruction. SB 48 (2011-2012) LenoOpposeYes
Existing law requires instruction in social sciences to include a study of the role and contributions of both men and women and specified categories of persons to the development of California and… More
Existing law requires instruction in social sciences to include a study of the role and contributions of both men and women and specified categories of persons to the development of California and the United States. This bill would update references to certain categories of persons and additionally would require instruction in social sciences to include a study of the role and contributions of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender Americans, persons with disabilities, and members of other cultural groups, to the development of California and the United States. Existing law prohibits instruction or school sponsored activities that promote a discriminatory bias because of race, sex, color, creed, handicap, national origin, or ancestry. Existing law prohibits the State Board of Education and the governing board of any school district from adopting textbooks or other instructional materials that contain any matter that reflects adversely upon persons because of their race, sex, color, creed, handicap, national origin, or ancestry. This bill would revise the list of characteristics included in these provisions by referring to race or ethnicity, gender, religion, disability, nationality, and sexual orientation, or other characteristic listed as specified. Existing law prohibits a governing board of a school district from adopting instructional materials that contain any matter reflecting adversely upon persons because of their race, color, creed, national origin, ancestry, sex, handicap, or occupation, or that contain any sectarian or denominational doctrine or propaganda contrary to law. This bill would revise the list of characteristics included in this provision to include race or ethnicity, gender, religion, disability, nationality, sexual orientation, and occupation, or other characteristic listed as specified. Existing law requires that when adopting instructional materials for use in the schools, governing boards of school districts shall include materials that accurately portray the role and contributions of culturally and racially diverse groups including Native Americans, African Americans, Mexican Americans, Asian Americans, European Americans, and members of other ethnic and cultural groups to the total development of California and the United States. This bill would revise the list of culturally and racially diverse groups to also include Pacific Islanders, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender Americans, and persons with disabilities. Existing law provides that there shall be no discrimination on the basis of specified characteristics in any operation of alternative schools or charter schools. This bill would state the intent of the Legislature that alternative and charter schools take notice of the provisions of this bill in light of provisions of existing law that prohibit discrimination in any aspect of their operation. This bill also would make other technical, nonsubstantive changes. Hide
An Act to Amend Section 19605.73 Of, to Add Sections 19601.02, 19605.74, and 19642.1 To, and to Add Article 9.1 (Commencing with Section 19604.5) to Chapter 4 of Division 8 Of, the Business and Professions Code, Relating to Horse Racing. SB 1072 (2009-2010) CalderonOpposeYes
(1)Existing law authorizes a thoroughbred association or fair, subject to approval by the California Horse Racing Board, to deduct from the parimutuel pool for any type of wager, a specified… More
(1)Existing law authorizes a thoroughbred association or fair, subject to approval by the California Horse Racing Board, to deduct from the parimutuel pool for any type of wager, a specified percentage for the meeting of the thoroughbred association or fair that accepts the wager. This bill would require every thoroughbred association or fair that conducts a live race meeting to deduct an additional 2% of the total amount handled on exotic wagers requiring the selection of 2 wagering interests, and 3% on exotic wagers requiring the selection of 3 or more wagering interests. The bill would require that these funds be distributed into the purse account of the meet conducting racing in the zones in which the wager was placed, to be used to augment overnight purses. This bill would require any thoroughbred racing association or fair that authorizes betting systems located outside of this state to accept wagers on a race to retain from the total amount received from the out-of-state betting system, less certain specified deductions made pursuant to existing law, the incremental amount received as a result of the 2% or 3% takeout on exotic wagers required by this bill, for distribution as overnight purses. This bill would require that the method utilized to determine the incremental amount received as a result of the takeout increase be established by agreement between the various affected thoroughbred racing associations and fairs, and horsemen’s organizations. If these groups are unable to agree as to the method of determining the incremental amount received, this bill would require the board to determine the allocation method after holding a hearing. For a thoroughbred association hosting the Breeders’ Cup Championship series, this bill would require the amounts collected pursuant to the above provisions requiring that 2% or 3% be deducted from the amount handled on exotic wagers be set aside for the purpose of promoting and sponsoring the Breeders’ Cup. The bill would require the thoroughbred racing association hosting the Breeders’ Cup to enter into an agreement with the organization that operates the Breeders’ Cup regarding the expenditure of the funds, as provided, and would require a written report be made to the board regarding how the funds were utilized. (2)Existing law provides that the California Horse Racing Board shall have all powers necessary to carry out the purposes of the Horse Racing Law, such as adopting rules and regulations to protect the public, allocating dates for and controlling horse racing and parimutuel wagering, and enforcing all rules and regulations. This bill would authorize exchange wagering, defined by the bill as a form of parimutuel wagering in which 2 or more persons place identically opposing wagers in a given market, provided that the entity offering exchange wagering is licensed by the board and has entered into an exchange wagering agreement between the licensee, the applicable racing association or fair conducting live racing, and the horsemen’s organization responsible for negotiated purse agreements for the breed on which exchange wagers are accepted, as provided. The bill would invest the board with the full power to prescribe rules, regulations, and conditions under which exchange wagering may be conducted in California, except that the bill would require the board to develop rules that prohibit certain persons associated with an entrant in a particular race from placing an exchange wager on a race involving that entrant, that prohibit the placing of exchange wagers on previously run races, that require the exchange wagering licensee to provide information to the person placing the wager, that prohibit the use of automatic or quick picks to place an exchange wager, and that prohibit the displaying of the results of a wager using casino themes, as provided. The bill would allow the board to recover any costs associated with the licensing and regulation of exchange wagering by imposing an assessment on the licensee. The bill would require that these funds be deposited in the Horse Racing Fund, to be available upon appropriation by the Legislature for the sole purpose of regulating exchange wagering. The bill would prohibit the taking of exchange wagers by an exchange wagering licensee prior to May 1, 2012. (3)Existing law provides that unclaimed refunds from horse racing are to be distributed to an organization that is responsible for negotiating business agreements on behalf of horsemen, to be held in trust for the purpose of negotiating an agreement with a jockeys’ organization to provide health and welfare benefits to California licensed jockeys. Existing law requires that the funds held in trust shall not exceed $450,000. Pursuant to the above provision, this bill would require each exchange wagering licensee to annually distribute the greater of $100,000, or an amount equal to 0.001 multiplied by the total amount of exchange revenue collected by the licensee in that year, to be used for the purposes specified above. (4)Existing law permits racing associations, fairs, and the organization responsible for contracting with racing associations and fairs with respect to the conduct of racing meetings, to form a private, statewide marketing organization to market and promote thoroughbred and fair horse racing, and to obtain, provide, or defray the cost of workers’ compensation coverage for stable employees and jockeys of thoroughbred trainers. Existing law requires the marketing organization to annually submit to the California Horse Racing Board a statewide marketing and promotion plan and a thoroughbred trainers’ workers’ compensation defrayal plan for thoroughbred and fair horse racing. Existing law requires 0.4% of the amount handled by each satellite wagering facility to be distributed to the marketing organization for the promotion of thoroughbred and fair horse racing, and to defray the cost of workers’ compensation insurance, as specified. Existing law repeals these provisions on January 1, 2011. This bill would extend the operation of these provisions until January 1, 2014, when they would be repealed. The bill would specify that its provisions allowing for the formation of a private statewide marketing association apply to thoroughbred racing associations, fairs, and the organization responsible for contracting with thoroughbred racing associations and fairs with respect to the conduct of racing meetings. The bill would specify that the marketing and promotion activities that the marketing organization may engage in include, but are not limited to, the establishment and maintenance of an Internet Web site, players incentive programs, and the funding of promotional activities at satellite wagering facilities. This bill would change the amount to be distributed to the marketing organization for the promotion of thoroughbred and fair racing from an amount equal to 0.4% of the amount handled at each satellite wagering facility to an amount not to exceed 0.25%, and would delete the provision allowing for the funds to be used to defray the cost of workers’ compensation coverage for stable employees and jockeys of thoroughbred trainers. The bill would require that the initial distribution be 0.2% of the total amount handled by satellite wagering facilities for thoroughbred and fair meetings only and would allow the board to adjust this amount to an aggregate of 0.25% of the total amount handled by satellite wagering facilities for thoroughbred and fair meetings only. The bill would, with respect to the statewide marketing and promotion plan, instead require the marketing organization, by November 1 of each year, to submit a written report to the board on the statewide marketing and promotion plan for the upcoming calendar year, and would additionally require the marketing organization to annually present to the board at the board’s November meeting a verbal report on the statewide marketing and promotion plan for the upcoming calendar year. The bill would delete the requirement that the marketing organization submit to the board a thoroughbred trainers’ workers’ compensation defrayal plan. The bill would also require the marketing organization to quarterly submit to the board a written report that accounts for all receipts and expenditures of the promotion funds for the previous 3 months. (5)Existing law authorizes the board, in performing its responsibilities, to participate in the affairs of associations having as their purpose the interchange of information relating to racing law enforcement, the licensing of horse racing participants, the registration of race horses, the tabulation, analysis, and publication of statistical information based on parimutuel handles and the distribution of proceeds, and to conduct research regarding horse racing accidents, and the detection of drugs on race horses, among other things. This bill would provide that, in addition to certain specified distributions, an amount not to exceed 0.05% of the total amount handled by each satellite wagering facility shall be distributed to a nonprofit organization designated by the board for the purposes of maintaining a database of horse racing information to further the purposes of the above provision. The bill would state that the amount distributable to the nonprofit organization shall initially be 0.05% of the total amount handled by each satellite wagering facility and may be adjusted by the board, in its discretion. The bill would require the nonprofit organization to submit an annual budget and file quarterly financial statements with the board. (6)By imposing new requirements under the Horse Racing Law, the violation of which would be a crime, this bill would create new crimes and would thereby impose a state-mandated local program. (7)The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason. Hide
An Act to Amend Section 68130.7 Of, to Amend, Repeal, and Add Section 68130.5 Of, and to Add Sections 66021.6, 66021.7, and 76300.5 To, the Education Code, Relating to Student Financial Aid. SB 1460 (2009-2010) CedilloOpposeNo
(1)Existing law requires that a person, other than a nonimmigrant alien, as defined, who has attended high school in California for 3 or more years, who has graduated from a California high school or… More
(1)Existing law requires that a person, other than a nonimmigrant alien, as defined, who has attended high school in California for 3 or more years, who has graduated from a California high school or attained the equivalent thereof, who has registered at or attends an accredited institution of higher education in California not earlier than the fall semester or quarter of the 2001–02 academic year, and who, if he or she is an alien without lawful immigration status, has filed a prescribed affidavit, is exempt from paying nonresident tuition at the California Community Colleges and the California State University. This bill would enact the California Dream Act of 2010. The bill, as of July 1, 2011, would exempt a person who has attended, for 3 or more years, at least one of which shall have been in a high school, and graduated from, secondary school in California from paying nonresident tuition at the California Community Colleges and the California State University. Under the bill, persons attending and graduating from California technical schools and adult schools, as well as high schools, would be included within the scope of this provision. (2)The Donahoe Higher Education Act sets forth, among other things, the missions and functions of California’s public and independent segments of higher education, and their respective institutions of higher education. Provisions of the act apply to the University of California only to the extent that the Regents of the University of California, by appropriate resolution, act to make a provision applicable. In any action in which a state court finds that a specified law, or any similar provision adopted by the regents, is unlawful, existing law authorizes the court to order the administering entity that is the subject of the lawsuit to terminate any waiver awarded under that statute or action, as equitable relief, prohibits the award of money damages, tuition refund or waiver, or other retroactive relief, and provides that the California Community Colleges, the California State University, and the University of California are immune from the imposition of any award of money damages, tuition refund or waiver, or other retroactive relief in a lawsuit. This bill would amend the Donahoe Higher Education Act, as of July 1, 2011, to require the Trustees of the California State University and the Board of Governors of the California Community Colleges, and to request the regents, to establish procedures and forms that enable persons who are exempt from paying nonresident tuition under the provision described in (1) above, or who meet equivalent requirements adopted by the regents, to apply for, and participate in, all student aid programs administered by these segments to the full extent permitted by federal law, except as provided. This provision would apply to the University of California only if the regents, by appropriate resolution, act to make it applicable. If a state court finds that this provision, or a similar provision adopted by the regents, is unlawful, this bill would provide that the same limitations described above would apply. This bill would further provide that, on and after January 1, 2011, a student attending the California State University, the California Community Colleges, or the University of California who is exempt from paying nonresident tuition under the provision described above would be eligible to receive a scholarship derived from nonstate funds received, for the purpose of scholarships, by the segment at which he or she is a student. Existing federal law requires that a state may provide that an alien who is not lawfully present in the United States is eligible for any state or local public benefit for which that alien would otherwise be ineligible under a specified federal law only through enactment of a state law that affirmatively provides for that eligibility. This bill would find and declare that the amendments to the Donahoe Higher Education Act described above are state laws within the meaning of this federal provision. (3)Existing law establishes the California Community Colleges under the administration of the Board of Governors of the California Community Colleges. Existing law authorizes the establishment of community college districts under the administration of community college governing boards, and authorizes these districts to provide instruction, for prescribed fees, at community college campuses throughout the state. Existing law authorizes the waiver of these fees for, among others, students who are eligible under income standards established by the board of governors. This bill, as of July 1, 2011, would require community college districts to waive the fees of persons who are exempt from nonresident tuition under the provision described in (1) above, and who otherwise qualify for a waiver under this provision, under regulations and procedures adopted by the board of governors. Because the bill would impose new duties on community college districts with respect to determining eligibility for fee waivers, the bill would constitute a state-mandated local program. (4)The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement. This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to these statutory provisions. Hide
Relative to Same-Sex Marriage SR 7 (2009-2010) LenoOpposeNo